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money from the depositors. cyprus has an economy the size of vermont but the assets eight times more than the country's gdp. therein the financial woes come as no surprise to analysts. listen to what alan greenspan said friday. >> europe has been hanging over the american markets for quite a while. the removal of that risk, i think temporarily, i think it is only temporary, has enabled the underlying forces of the market to begin to come into vision. >> and today, the clearer vision that greenspan referred to was clouded the cyprus, we have the report by cyprus matters. >> reporter: cyprus is a smaller island with a smaller economy. but now they're watching what happens in the tiny mediterranean nation. >> it's a tiny nation. the reason we care about it is of course cyprus like it was in greece. it's what it means for the bigger nations if they follow and go down the same bath. >> banking is a huge part of cyprus' economy. and it's a mess. if it fails the country will probably fail, too and the european union will not let the country fail. here's the thing, the biggest payers are the
schoumacher. the federal reserve board is responsible for deciding how much money the economy needs to grow. in the early 1970s, the fed held to a policy of using the money supply to try to keep the economy on course. in times of inflation, the fed tightened the money supply to squeeze excess dollars out of the economy. in times of recession, it increased the money supply to stimulate growth. but in 1975, the fed, under the chairmanship of arthur burns, faced a new and troubling dilemma -- caught between persistent inflation and a growing recession, how did chairman burns keep the economy on course? by late 1974, inflation had become a serious economic problem. under pressure from rising fuel prices, inflation rose to a staggering 12%. inflated interest rates had driven up the price of mortgages and brought the building industry to a standstill. sales of new cars and home appliances plunged. in september, president gerald ford asked congress to join him in a battle against inflation. my first priority is to work with you to bring inflation under control. inflation is domestic enemy number o
the markets are in a bubble right now, and that the economy is recovering. >> we still have a lot of work to do. but there doesn't seem to be any push to create a crisis over the debt limit or over shutting down the government. i think that's helpful. we've had economic data come out for quite a while now showing that we have a resilient economy that is growing. >> retail sales were growing. they came in better than expected for the month of february, rising 1.1%, the best numbers since september. analysts were concerned about the impact of gasoline prices and the increase in the payroll tax for us, but consumers are still spending money. important because that makes up about 70% of america's economic growth. and if you're looking for something new to buy, samsung will be happy to oblige. introducing its new galaxy 4 smartphone this week. the phone features a five-inch screen, a larger battery and a screen you don't have to touch, but just hover your fingers over. samsung is apple's main competition in the smartphone market. >>> well, the markets setting new records almost every day, and
mostly on the british economy. specifically on budget reform, childcare benefit, and performs to the national health service this is just over 30 minutes. >> order. questions to the prime minister. >> number one, mr. speaker. businessorning, i had with ministerial colleagues and others and i shall have further such meetings later today. time minister the believes there is an alternative to his double debt and his loss of a aaa credit rating. is he aware that some in his cabinet believe there is an alternative for him? >> what this government is delivering is a million private sector jobs, the fastest rate of job creation in this country's history and banged on the debt by 25%. we have cut immigration by a third. we have a long road to travel, but we are going in the right direction. i'm sure that the prime minister will wish to add his condolences to the family and friends of christina at ken's who was murdered on a path to school in my constituency last thursday morning. the government is right to introduce minimum custodial substances for people convicted of threatening some
were born in rome. >> i was born in rome and raised in rome. >> rose: the pope, the economy, the smart phone and a tour of rome when we continue. captioning sponsored by rose communications from our studios in new york city, this is charlie rose. >> rose: we begin this evening with continued analysis of the historic events in rome. all eyes on the vatican. on wednesday evening, jorge berguliglo many saw him as a surprise choice. he's the first jesuit. pope francis is known for humanity and long time service to the poor. he inherits a troubled church much reconciled tradition with a modernizing world. joining me now in rome and new york, monsignor lorenzo al katie and frank bruni and on the phone from rome daniel wakin to talk about what has happened since the selection of the new pope -- why this pope. >> two main reasons. one is significant cardinals really did want to go in a different direction. i think they wanted someone that into of could interject a hint of humanity and solidarity with the poor. a tough administrator. and the other part which is hard to figure out is due to the
. the economist is out with a report on our economy's saying that our economy is in better shape than you think. we're back with that in a moment. first, i want to give a shout out to my grandmother mabel. she convinced her nursing home to switch cable providers just to see the cycle every day. go, mabel! [ jackie ] it's just so frustrating... ♪ the middle of this special moment and i need to run off to the bathroom. ♪ i'm fed up with always having to put my bladder's needs ahead of my daughter. ♪ so today, i'm finally talking to my doctor about overactive bladder symptoms. [ female announcer ] know that gotta go feeling? ask your doctor about prescription toviaz. one toviaz pill a day significantly reduces sudden urges and accidents, for 24 hours. if you have certain stomach problems or glaucoma, or can not empty your bladder, you should not take toviaz. get emergency medical help right away if your face, lips, throat or tongue swells. toviaz can cause blurred vision, dizziness, drowsiness and decreased sweating. do not drive, operate machinery or do unsafe tasks until you know how tovia
economy, child-care benefits, and reforms to the national health service. this is just over 30 minutes. >> order. questions to the prime minister. eagues and others and in addition to my duties in this house i shall have server, furt >> the prime minister. >> this morning, i had meetings with ministerial colleagues and others, and, in addition to my duties in this house, i shall have further such meetings later today. >> we all know that the prime minister believes there is no alternative to his double-dip, his double-debt, or his loss of the triple-a credit rating, but is he aware that his back benchers and some of his cabinet believe there is an alternative to him? hear, hear. >> what this government are delivering are 1 million private-sector jobs and the fastest rate of new business noires history. we have paid down the deficit by 25% and have cut immigration by a third. we have a long, hard road to travel, but we are going in the right direction. >> hear, hear. >> mr. james morris. >> i am sure that the prime minister will wish to add his condolences to the family and friends of c
, it has taken us 40 years to build our economy to the level it is. with done one day -- within one day, we have shot it down. we are very betrayed. >> they can do it anywhere. live in europe, europe has betrayed us. >> at one stage, the crowd was urged to march towards the presidential palace. many people believed their savings had been guaranteed. what is clear is that the bailout deal negotiated in brussels cannot be implemented here except in the face of furious opposition. will have depositors to pay -- just reducing the amounts savers and depositors will have to pay probably won't be enough. teeple are still trying to get their money out of cash machines, but there are limits on how much they can withdraw. a parliamentary vote on the bailout has been postponed yet again. the government feared it might not win a majority for the bailout. without extra funding, cyprus faces bankruptcy. the british community around -- the british community, around 60,000, is also assessing its losses. cypriot friends are in shock. >> they felt as though someone had put their hand in their pocket and take
's face it. cyprus is a small economy. the smallest thread can unravel the entire tapestry of the euro zone. the size of cyprus is not the point here. the point is the principle, precedent and risk of contagion spiralling out of control. >> that's how we see it here. thank you, charles dallara. now it's time to ask the money question. will cyprus and the eu woes kill our economic optimism? we'll debate that next up. the real loser could be crooked russian billionaires whose money-laundering operations in cyprus run the country. that's why vladimir putin is so angry about this bank tax. feel like capitalism may be the best bet to prosperity, but there is not one ounce of free market capitalism in this cyprus story. i'm larry kudlow. we'll be right back. [ female announcer ] what if the next big thing, isn't a thing at all? it's lots of things. all waking up. connecting to the global phenomenon we call the internet of everything. ♪ it's going to be amazing. and exciting. and maybe, most remarkably, not that far away. we're going to wake the world up. and watch, with eyes wide, as it ge
coming up. in the next hour we're going to be talking the economy and the dow with jennifer ericsson from the center for american progress, and then we'll talk about cpac and james homan was at cpac and he'll be here in studio with us. the president is kind of kicking back this morning. he has private meetings in the morning, getting the daily briefing and then at 4:40 this afternoon we'll be delivering marks at a women's history gathering. another hour of the "full court press" coming up. [♪ theme music ♪] >> bill: good morning, everybody. itit i is s mondayayararchch 1 18th. welcome to the "full court press" here on current tv. we're bringing you up to date on all of the latest developments here in our nation's capitol, around the country and the globe, whatever is happening we'll tell you about it. and you get to tell us what it means to you by giving us a call at 866-55-press, joining us on twitter @bpshow, and there is a civil war among republicans. sarah palin said karl rove if he's so smart he ought to go back to texas and run for office, and karl ro
insolvent. the banks in cyprus are huge, eight times the size of the economy. consider that here in the united states. our banking system is roughly one-time the size of our economy. what we're waiting to see next are they going to get this through parliament and get it done? it is so controversial they're trying to find out different ways to make it less controversial. impose the tax on larger shareholders to a much greater degree. it was originally 9.9% and you go to 12%. if you didn't want to tax the small guys at all you'd have to go to 15% or 16%. this is the scene when the president walked into the palace headquarters. there were people there with no written on their hand and this says merkel stole our money. keep in mind, european union will still give them 10 billion euros and they were trying to come up to reduce the original size from 17 billion euros. the other thing to keep in mind, by taxing depositors they're taxing a lot of foreigners and a lot of russians who had kept their money. the thing is will the rest of europe, will small depositors across the rest of europ
in washington. is something going to get done this year, and would a balanced budget hurt the economy? joining me for debate, the republican wlip in the house, kevin mccarthy, and the top democrat on the budget committee, congressman chris van hollen. >> we'll talk about the future of the republican party, and >> we'll talk about the future of the republican party, and republican governor scott walker for those nights when it's more than a bad dream, be ready. for the times you need to double-check the temperature on the thermometer, be ready. for high fever, nothing works faster or lasts longer. be ready with children's motrin. like a squirrel stashes nuts, you may be muddling through allergies. try zyrtec® liquid gels. nothing starts working faster than zyrtec® at relieving your allergy symptoms for 24 hours. zyrtec®. love the air. >>> on tuesday, the day a new pope was installed in rome, president obama makes a sensitive trip to the holy land for his first presidential trip to israel. the trip isn't ambitious. mostly the president seems to be responding to critics who question why he's n
agenda. he got health care passed and fixed the economy. he has the economy on the right track. the gun issue was not a big deal with him in the beginning. gale marriage was not a big issue, but they have become centerpieces, that's the period he's in at this point. republicans are cooperating to the degree that they appeared to be disorganized enough that he appears to be right on track. >> you know, on that point, in terms of the economy, victoria, the president talking about the budget last week, he said something that the gop just jumped all over. the president said, and i'm quoting him, we don't have an immediate crisis in terms of debt, and the republicans and the right wing went bananas. but then mr. boehner and ryan, of course, agree with him. watch this. >> we do not have an immediate debt crisis, but we all know that we have one looming. >> we do not have a debt crisis right now, but we see it coming. we know it's irrefeetably happeningivities they say the president shouldn't have said it, now you have boehner and ryan saying it, about you if both say we don't have an immediat
and the austerity he is putting in place has caused the economy to be really slow. >> a lot of tax increases over there in europe. we look at this austerity bit. i want to talk about this for a second. >> i want to get back to the budget then. >> talk about what is happening in washington. you know, economics discussed on tv or on the internet or on twitter, it's so depressing, because people really don't know what they are talking about and they just sort of boil it down and there is this belief through the years, that tax cuts are not a tool used. of course, tax cuts are a tool used and tax increases something that traditional are against in bad times. we hear about austerity across great britain and we never hear about the tax increases. when you talk about the fact they cut and slash spending at the same time they hike taxes, it really was a formula made to fail. >> spending cuts and tax increases both take money out of the economy and slow the economy and, yes, they create this idea of austerity. but, look. it's a balancing problem. on the one hand you need to deal with it budgets and defici
of health has come out no. 1 after the economy. the economy is a little bit broad to deal with. that was no. 1. but health was came as far as something that we can do something about. the interesting one for no. 2 and this is the third or fourth year in a row that the quality of public education came out no. 2 and i think when people talk about small business issue, they don't think about that one. no. 3, no surprise, regulations. no. 4, taxation. no. 5, this is another one that i find can kind of interesting. last year it was actually no. 4, but infrastructure. small businesses are concerned about infrastructure, and it's been borne out again by the survey. as far as some of the interesting specifics of the respondents, 48% provide health insurance, 52% did not provide health insurance. interestingly enough and maybe i will talk a little bit more, 74% almost had never heard of the small business tax credit. 63% had never talked to their state senator. their assembly person or to the governor, which i think is a little scary and it's something that hopefully you as a commissioner will re[tp
this going as well as it is because it's really a commitment to the economy of the whole region as to this particular project. having said that, the super bowl bid is an incredible thing and the strength of our bid is a collaboration of this whole region. this is how we think we will win this bid. this is not for any one particular city, it's us working together. not only on transportation issues, not only on cites, but all the hospitality that we have set. i want to thank all the regionals for working together. we want that super bowl xv very badly. we think we have the greatest opportunity to work for it and not only to win that bid, but to get ourselves in an incredible rotation for other super bowl hosting. we look at this long-term and it's the reasonable approach that will give us the strengths for the nfl to take into consideration. i want to be thankful for all the regions mayor's for joining us and the 49er organization. they brought us together at this time. it's going to be a great thing for san francisco. thank you. >> thank you for coming out. his is an amazing site
.2948. >> some positive news for the european economy today. airbus has just signed the biggest civil aviation deal in history. it is with ryanair. >> it will provide a much-needed boost to the economy promising to secure 5000 jobs in france alone over the coming decade. >> the signatures are worth a lot of money. airbus will likely discount package of 234 plans, they have a list price of 18 billion euro. assembly will take part in france with parts from several european locations. it will be at capacity for four years. >> of bills meanwhile pride that we epitomize european success. we are working together to create jobs. >> the deal means more than money and well paying jobs. ryanair is a new customer for airbus. they have previously purchased all their planes from their arrival, boeing. >> the western-backed opposition is meeting in istanbul to p ick the new prime minister. the first tasks is creating a cabinet. >> the conflict is expected to escalate further with britain and france say they plan on our main local groups. especially when it comes to political and military priorities, they do
of the economy is about 18 billion euros, so the banking industry is four times the size of the economy. if you allow the banks to fail, much like letting citibank or jpmorgan here in the united states, that would have significant repercussion the in the economy. connell: where do you stand on the idea of the con cement spreading? could it happen in other countries was the question asked, it seemed like, in the markets this morning if it goes through on cypress, on to the next guy and next who have problems? >> that's a legitimate concern that the architect or one of the principle architects here, the imf, the ecb, and the european union and germany with a strong hand there. if they force this upon one country, who is to say they couldn't force it upon a larger, more important country? if europe were able to execute a plan like that, who is to say that the united states wouldn't look and say, well, they did it in europe, why couldn't we look here? connell: rule of law question; right? >> exactly. dagen: what's the solution? somewhere between forcing the haircut and letting banks fail? where is
, and the economy. without it, things simply can't exist. woman: we have good health in this country, in part, because we have clean water. and we shouldn't forget that, and we shouldn't take it for granted. melosi: in the late 19th century, serious waterborne disease epidemics were having devastating effects. roy: but then, in the early 1900s, we began to treat our water. and since then, we've seen a rapid decline in the incidence of waterborne disease. narrator: most cities treat drinking water through filtration, chlorination, and sometimes ozonation to kill pathogens in the source supply. these are complex treatment plants that cost millions of dollars to operate, but are necessary for our wellbeing. the treatment of drinking water has been called one of the greatest public health achievements of the last century. the water infrastructure itself protects the treated water until it comes out of our taps. it's been since 1911, since we had an outbreak of cholera or typhoid in the united states. but that doesn't mean that it can't happen. it can happen. if we aren't on our guard all the time
until you topple the entire economy. >> there budget is built on a hoax. on the one handled they say it balances in ten years. on the other hand they say they repeal obama care. but they keep the savings in obama care. if you would repeal obama care today, their budget would not be in balance. >> you saw him there, the democratic congressman, the top democrat on the committee. good to see you. >> good to be with you. >> in the past hour, you announced what you're calling a house democratic budget alternative. first of all, what is it and how is it different from the previous plan offered by the senate? >> well, it is similar to the senate plan. in other words, we also focus on job creation and accelerating the economy right now. then we address the long term budget deficit in a balanced way where we ask for shared responsibility as opposed to the republican plan which provides another tax break wind fall to very wealthy people at the end of everybody else. the expense of the middle class, the expense of commitments to seniors. so our focus right now is to number one, do no harm to th
. that's good for 125th in the world. per sapt a gdp, $26,900. 71% of the economy service based. tourism big there. 20% is industry. 8.5% agriculture, mostly olives and citrus. in a nut shell, finance ministers are going to hold a conference call this evening to discuss a proposed bailout for the cypriot banks. the plan started this weekend included taking money from regular bank deposit, large and small, 6.75% to almost 10% if you've got more than 100,000 euros in an account over there. why are those banks in cyprus in trouble? they were heavily exposed to greek debt and we all know what happened there with the greek debt, both public and private. then the cypriot banks were national as ied to prevent an need colorado lapse. european regs, that's where the rest of europe comes in. instead of sending a bailout like it did in spain and greece, germany wants to raise money from actual people with deposits in those banks. here's how goldman sachs' paul o'neill summed it up on "squawk" this morning. >> i got off a plane from singapore saturday morning and i thought my jet lag was up but i wa
is a big concern. china is a big concern. they said china's economy is showing symptoms that sparked the crisis in 2008, the warning and saying they risk financial crisis. obviously, concerns about china. i'm going to stick to the cypress theme and put it together. the vix, fear index popped. you see the 1275 right now, up 17%. at one point, up 13%. right now, let's look at the financials because they certainly reacted. in some cases, dramatically, and the idea of them taxing deposits there. citigroup down 2% and banks abroad hit harder. back to you. >> a full and complete report, thank you, nicole. >> for the bailout proposal, is the tax on bank deposits, and that is sparking outrage and fear that there's going to be a run on the banks there. david, chairman and chief investment officer of dumb beer land as visiers of -- cumberland, and why do you think it's a big deal, david? >> caller: well, the finance ministers, the decision has been announced. the cat is out of the bag. once you open the door to taxing a deposit when you have a liquidity crisis, you can never close the door aga
in a trillion dollars. you would still be left with a deficit and you would wreck the economy. martha: interesting lesson. stuart, thanks very much. we'll be watching it throughout the day as i know you will. let's look at bigger picture of europe's debt crisis. five countries needed bailouts from the european central bank and imf. greece, spain, ireland, portugal as stuart mentioned. germany the fifth biggest. great britain at number eight. france with the 9th largest. italy at number ten. they all shrunk in the last quarter of last year. europe is basically contracting. the eurozone is losing huge numbers of jobs. a record 19 million people are unemployed. it is a tough picture and one we need to watch closely here at home. bill: sure do. no telling when that thing will get straightened out. >>> more rough water for carnival cruise lines. another disabled ship of vacationers, limping back to port. legend arriving yesterday. a leading senator calling for a passenger bill of rights. what would be in that bill? peter doocy live in washington. what would this bill of rights do, peter? >
that we can't do anything about climate change that the experts are urging us to do and keep our economy growing. what's the argument to respond to that? >> well, i'll tell you, that is a myth. it's a false choice. it's a zero sum game. you either can grow the economy or you can protect the environment, okay? so i changed the question, and i've been doing this now for several years. i said, okay, here's the question: do you believe that protecting the environment harms the economy and costs jobs, has no impact on the economy or jobs, or actually grows the economy and improves jobs? okay? and what do we find? an overwhelming majority of americans, and i'm talking like two-thirds of americans, say that it either has no impact or it actually improves the economy. in fact, that's the most frequently chosen answer is that most americans don't see this as an inherent contradiction. >> what you're saying is that a big powerful industry controls or affects the outcomes of perception in this country disproportionately to what most people think? >> that's right. and, in part, they're able to do th
can be the linchpin in our economy over here. it's ridiculous. >> right. it should be a smaller problem. they could take care of this in other ways. they could print money or -- >> i'm not going to pick a state here. it would probably be a southern state, but a poor southern state cannot take the down the united states. >> a western state because they're not awake yet. but here we are. out of the 22 -- cyprus? >> you thought greece was small, cyprus is -- >> come on, cypriots? i remember some conflicts. i thought it was a golf course, which would be a much bigger problem to me. >> let's introduce our guest host this morning, kenny dichter, co-founder of avian. why do i always mispronounce it? because you've been b drinking it. >> avione is airplane in french and spanish. >> can we get a full shot of this? he's now the chairman of juicepress. i have been drinking this stuff for the past week, virtually, five days. >> and you know what? your skin tone has never looked better. >> no food up until this saturday. you've been doing this now -- >> 22 days. >> i've made my cleanse zero
over republicans handling the economy to just a four-point advantage. congress is down there with saddam hussein and gaddafi and popularity, except that the other guys, being dead, don't really care. congress does. the president has to do the charm offensive because he got cocky. he won the election and he crushed republicans on the fiscal cliff, and he tried to do it on sequester. sequester, the way he pushed it, was a mistake. he overshot with talk of the apocalypse, which exposed and to ridicule. but then he acted so cynically with the biggest example being the shutting down of the white house tours, and people can understand that the administration was deliberately trying to find stuff that would be painful and visible rather than being economical with cuts. that is white and he had to retreat -- why he had to retreat. purposes.s serves two it makes the eu and look efficient by contrast, and makes the president's job rating look good by comparison. a continuing resolution, a washington speech, -- to fund, government's there will be an agreement on that pit the crunc
. manufacturer are expected to relocate sites to newly emerging economies. they want to take advantage of lower costs. analysts say if the figure continues to drop, it will affect regional economies in japan as well as employment. >>> elderly japanese suffering from dementia could soon be using the latest technology to help them lead more fulfilling lives. the research institute of the national rehabilitation center for persons with disabilities organized an event to display their newest equipment. about 100 people attended, including family members and helpers who look after people with dementia. a pill case reminds users to take their medicine and even prevents accidental overdoses. the case is fitted with an alarm and dispenses the correct amount of medicine. researchers said 19 elderly people who forgot to take pills more than once a week tried using the case. after three months, 14 of them found it helpful. other equipment included a transmitter attached to purses or keys. when a remote control button is pushed the equipment emits a sound to help the user locate the eye tim. an electronic
for a job for a long time. i am trying to support my children. >> those involved ways government -- economy -- though zimbabwe's economy has begun recovering, full recovery remains elusive. would coste industry at least $1 billion. it is unlikely they will get the funds anytime soon. mohammed adow, al jaazeera. >> two years ago, a visit by the leader of myanmar to australia would have been highly improbable. now, thein sein -- now thein sein has become the first myanmar president to visit australia in four decades. australia is boosting aid. , civilunited states rights groups are taking the new york city's police department to court, claiming that the stop and frisk policy unfairly targets minorities. this east new york city neighborhood, crime and poverty are rampant -- >> in this east new york city neighborhood, crime and poverty are rampant, that many young men say it is the police they fear most. some were afraid to give their last names in describing their dealings with police. >> how are you all doing? >> i have had going -- had guns pointed at me based on my appearance. stop and fri
have more friction with its neighbors as it expands its military along with its economy. foreign government officials are waiting to see what kind of diplomatic steps will be taken by chinese leaders. >> i think the new chinese government wants to stabilize its external affairs and focus on internal affairs. so it may be willing to stabilize its relationship with japan and the united states and china and stable economic growth are indispensable for achieving the recovery of china's economy. >> he says he is mainly watching two points. one is the possibility of a power struggle in the three-tiered power structure. and the other is china's one-party system. he doubts that the communist party will get enough support from the people in the future. it appears party officials do not intend to democratize the country. >> how long would they be able to avert change? i believe china will face critical moment in five to ten years from now. >> china's president and premier serve five-year terms. they are often re-elected, though, which means xi and li will probably be in charge for the next
at the department of labor as he is there, he will have a much broader effect on the economy and the way that people work and are employed. >> megyn: as we speak, we are just getting this breaking news in that senator vittert-- senator vitter is coming out and saying he'll block the perez nomination and saying he's committed to doing that and that he was directly involved in the the controversial new black panther voter intimidation case and his record should be met with great suspicion by those in the senate saying in particular his home state of louisiana needs to have cause for concern about the nomination. already begins, chris, thank you. >> yes, ma'am. >> megyn: and again, as we mentioned, mr. perez has been dogged by some controversy throughout his time at the doj, including the testimony he just mentioned to a civil rights commission about his handling of the new black panthers case. again, the inspector general finding that he did mislead when it came to that issue although concluding it was not intentional. that testimony and the background on the controversy are on foxnews.com right now,
to be made by car, then there would be no more amsterdam economy because no one would be able to move about. there would be one giant traffic jam all day. so the bike is the grease in the amsterdam economy. you have to build less highways, you have to build less parking garage. you put the bike -- use very little space. where you have to build parking garage, they're very expensive. there are recent surveys that companies pay up to 30,000 euros, that's $50,000 per year per person to have them traffic by car to work, where as a bike costs only 250 euros so there are large benefits at stake. also, there is lots of surveys that show that people who live in towns where there is more cycling, people like to live there better than in towns where there is less cycling. there are an overwhelming lot of advantages on cycling and i'm going to put some -- and then this is what oakland should do as few of them -- recommendations that are put together oakland also could be used for san francisco. one thing is, if you want to have these advantages, for instance, if you're scared about all the money that
property tax base, so housing prices, the strength of our tourism economy as well as job growth. as you might imagine, revenue projections are sensitive to the overall economic condition of the city so to the degree that the pay for the recovery is slower or federal spending cuts are more significant than what we -- than we're factoring in at the moment, those projections could change. overall, the plan assumes more conservative growth rates on revenue in the third, fourth and fifth years of the plan. one to have reasons for that is that we are now going into a pretty -- into a sustained period of economic recovery and over the last number of years, we know that we haven't been able to -- we've seen booms and busts in our economy so we need to be i think responsible in our revenue projections in those third, fourth and fifth years. there's still growth rates assumed but just at a lower level. >> ms. howard, quick question for you, and i appreciate that comment, i think as you look at economic cycles and so forth, you can make an argument that we're going into a shorter economic swing, h
, the economy will stop. we did a major outreach. we trained an outreach team, who went to every community meeting, to educate people on how bad the crisis was. not only did i tell people that we'd have to raise rates, i told them we'd have to tear up the city to repair this infrastructure. man: you can't simply say, "i won't use any water, it's too expensive." we have about 25% of our population that's at or below the poverty line, so you have to look at rate structures that are tiered so the people can pay their bills. franklin: we would love to have something like 75% federal money. we do get some federal aid and we are thankful, but on the other hand, we're paying for this primarily with new rates. we have increased our rates to among the highest in america. but not nearly as much as if we hadn't passed a one-cent sales tax dedicated to water and sewer infrastructure. hunter: that sales tax counts for about a third of the revenue of the department right now. franklin: we got 75% of the voters to agree to tax themselves so that their children and their children's children could have cle
.s. economy and u.s. institutions are the safest in the world and will be a beneficiary. lou: we watched eight straight records on the dow. 10 straight wins on the dow. but this has been an impressive performance. if it time to say we will see you in four or five points from here, i would look at prospect of a correction, what do you think? >> we have gone pretty far, pretty fast. in an interest rate environment. look at it from a relative basis, so that the equity market is pretty interesting place to be. we really haven't seen for a while. lou: we will get some indications on the housing market, we will look at building permits primarily, what are you expecting? >> still think the housing market is in pretty good shape, but if you look at the opportunity out there, seeing some places the housing market is doing pretty well, seeing a lot of the excess capacity in the marketplace, in a zero interest environment, a fair amount of the capacity, investment classes come in and actually bought up a fair amount of those equities. are we going back to the old days, absolutely not. lou: sean matthews,
, giving spirit. visualize a future where the economy is growing at a steady pace, entrepreneurs are building businesses, taking risks, innovating, investing, employing millions of americans come and as they employ these americans, they move them up the economic ladder. we are able to pay off our debt. they are confident and proud of their country. partys a vision tea patriots have for america's future. [cheers and applause] a constitutionally limited, fiscally responsible government, where free markets thrive. [applause] and for this vision, we have been mocked, marginalized, and maligned by president obama, nancy pelosi's, and majority leader harry reid. and people from the republican establishment, like senators john mccain and lindsey graham. our are contemptuous of vision, and our vision is distinctly different from today's reality. our country is $17 trillion in debt, and we are headed to bankruptcy. our gross domestic product shrunk, and wall street profits it. seven out of the 10 wealthiest counties in america are right here in boom town d.c. like "the hunger games." corr
of the banking system and of the whole economy. >> reporter: such talk may well be brinksmanship. it's not. these people and many more across europe would be forever changed by the events of the past three days. >> woodruff: for a closer look at the crisis in cyprus and why it's captured the attention of europe and the u.s., we turn to jacob kirkegaard, a senior fellow at the peterson institute for international economics. welcome to the program. >> my pleasure. woodruff: why does tiny cyprus, a population just over one million, have europe, the markets, the government so rattled? >> i think there's two main reasons. first of all that europe is still kind of on the edge. it doesn't take much to shatter the sort of recent lull of confidence that you have had in europe in the last couple of months. unfortunately, i think cyprus is one such thing. and the other element is that what happens in cyprus and with respect to the cyprusian banks have a large precedent-setting effect for how europe going forward is going to deal with banking crises in other european countries. then it begins to matte
'll have a long-lasting impact on our economy. we've been dealing with a lousy europe for a long time. but you'll have this pullback at 5 percent which is about 1484 and 7% at 53, i might consider getting back in, but i'm not doing it until then. cheryl: looks like europe doesn't have a plan, obvious. let's go to the nymex, jeffrey grossman. jeff, let's talk about the oil contract. one of things we saw today again was the safety of the u.s. dollar. you had traders around the world jumping into the dollar. your take. >> today was really a dream come true in many respects. we walked in this morning, the dollar was very strong, took our market down right to the support level. 91.75 and spot crude was a major support level on the way down. the minute the dollar weakened, came off those highs a little bit, market rallied right pack to where the resistance levels are which is in the high 93.85 to $94 level. it's behaving like a normal market really with a little input that came in from the european information here, but the truth of the matter is this is a market that still, again, is a sal
and the economy, support for proxies'. if you had the opportunity to sit quietly with the supreme leader of iran and talk to him, talk him out of whatever he appears to be intending to do, what would you say to him about u.s. intentions at u.s. cooperation with our partners in the region? >> i would send dennis rodman over there. [laughter] the truth is the first thing i would do i would ask why they are doing what they're doing and i would like to hear it from him personally. because we know of course what his surrogates and proxy's are doing. i would like to know from him they close by the way, you know in that region that the three countries that have always been country, iran, turkey, egypt, they are the cornerstone of that region. it does not mean that we want to be like them or anyone want to be like them, but we have to account for the fact that those three countries are the historic cornerstones or and points of that region. the first thing i would like to is what is a they believe the future holds for the region and why are they apparently, it seems to me, on a path to try to dredge up
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of the total economy were over 20%. in this republican fantasy land budgets are balanced with revenues at 19% of the economy, yet meeting the needs of 78 million more seniors and a infrastructure deficit that is growing as america is falling apart. clearly this is not remotely possible if we are going to enjoy anything like our current quality of life. there is a real world intersection of budget saving opportunities with potential areas of agreement. health care reform is one. but not just by shifting the burden to seniors and disabled as the republicans propose in their fantasy budget. my home state of oregon is the middle of an exciting demonstration of how to squeeze out the waste we all know is there and realign incentives. instead of the empty ritual of pretending to repeal obamacare, let's work together to accelerate reform for all americans. if the oregon experiment works, and frankly many of these efeshencies by the way are already achieved in other parts of the country and with some private health systems, we could save more than $1.2 trillion that is the flawed sequester is suppos
. make no mistake housing and -- two big drivers of this economy and i think we'll be pleasantly surprised when we get this housing starts number. of course, the fed bull from hell crowd will ratchet up their bets. that lightning will strike on wednesday if they see a strong number. and i think they will be, unfortunately, unpleasantly surprised when they see it because nobody in that crowd wants to see any good. i actually like things that are good. old fashioned. housing's so strong that it's lifting all boats including brunswick by the way and the housewares. so let's listen to william sonoma conference call on their earnings on tuesday to be sure the carryover's intact. now, i'm thinking this may be long in our ever expanding great index or maybe it's the greater gatsby index. i once bought a pot for like $200. it was a big, round cast iron, red thing and then i saw it at the jersey shore outlet for almost half the price. and i am still kicking myself. eighth anniversary, nothing's changed. now, we use a ton of gauges to measure things like retail sales and employment around
tightening the money market and the liquidities condition in the economy and where we flexed in the capital markets these days. >> great point. raymond yung joining us. thanks very much. a reminder again that what we're seeing in markets today isn't just about cyprus. it could potentially be that seasonal time of year once again where global sitters come to the fore. >>> straight ahead, find out why our next guest says the bank robbery is nothing more than legalized robbery. ery. ♪ (train horn) vo: wherever our trains go, the economy comes to life. norfolk southern. one line, infinite possibilities. there. i said it. they don't have pictures of my kids. they don't have my yoga mat. and still, i feel at home. could it be the flat screen tv? the not so mini fridge? ♪ the different free dinner almost every weeknight? or maybe, it's all of the above. and all the rest. am i home? nope. but it almost feels that way. homewood suites by hilton. be at home. >>> welcome back to "worldwide exchange." stocks falling around the globe with european banks deeply in the red as the cyprus bailout and co
at $500 since 1999. it's been pretty flat. we are getting more jobs. the economy is getting better but at a lower rate than it should be. we lost over 700,000 government jobs during the obama administration despite all the right wing talk about him the fact is the deficit is getting smaller and there are fewer and fewer government jobs. the addition of jobs we had last month, 236,000 jobs, 70 those of those were business service jobs. that's a good sign for the future. accountants office workers being hired that employeers expect more business in the future. but the sequester and the press for austerity and the increase of social security tax are all slowing our progress to where we should be. >> michael: of course these companies would be hiring accountants now because they're making so much damn money because they're not paying enough wages to their workers. that's part and parcel of how it works. >> yes remember a fundamental tenant of the chicago school and i went to the chicago school is to get rid of unions, that means driving down wages. i just reported in my column in tax a
opening concert about five weeks after that the economy completely crashed. my plan -- and i'm absolutely dogmatic about my plans --were delayed slightly. i would say that in this very difficult timefor the arts and everyone, especially the arts, it's phenomenal how new century has grown where many unfortunate organizations have stopped. during this period we got ourselves on national radio presence; we started touring, releasing cds, a dvd. we continue to tour. reputation grows and grows and grows and it has never stopped going forward. msk(music) >> the bay area knows the orchestra. you maybe take things for granted a little bit. that is simply not the case will go on the road. the audiences go crazy. they don't see vitality like this on stage. we are capable of conveying joy when we play. msk(music) >> any performance that we do, that a program, that will be something on the program that you haven't heard before. string orchestra repertoire is pretty small. i used to be boxed into small repertoire. i kept constantly looking for new repertoire and commissioning new arrangements. if you
the week. the president has been battling republicans over a way forward for the nation's economy. has the president, do you think, lost any leverage following the sequester? which some commentators are suggesting has not been anywhere near as bad as the president, himself, warned it would be? >> well, i think that the steps that he took in 2009 and 2010 and beyond have been great steps, and the american, in terms of bringing the country back, and the american economy is a resilient economy. but it was never the case that the sequester was going to on day one drag the economy down. and, you know, the concern is over the next six months and over the long term. one projection of one of the, i think macroeconomics said they expect to see 700,000 jobs lost as part of the sequester. that's going to be over time. so the wise thing to do would be to find a sensible replacement for the sequester in the coming months. and i think that's what his efforts are going to be placed. and hopefully he'll find partners on both sides of the aisle to do that in the coming months. but let's be honest about
point, it can't be at the expense of the economy and jobs. >> here's where both sides may agree. >> is he right that we did not have an immediate crisis. >> we did not have an immediate crisis. >> to borrow from the phrase from the fiscal commission, we're the healthiest looking horse in the blue factory. we see it coming we know it's irrefutably happening. a lot of folks worrying about that blue factory, congressman. the president said that crisis was a concern when he spoke to joe and mika early on. you said had said that was a concern. the president has changed his tone on that. why has he done that? >> well, the debt remains a concern-we've made a significant down payment with the budget control act, with the fiscal cliff deal and now with the sequester which i hope will have a short life. so we've made a significant dent already. but i think the president is facing the priority of growing the economy and jobs, and that's where it should be. half of this year's deficit is attributable to people who are unemployed. if we can get people back to work, paying down the deficit. i
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